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Building a Gray-Hoverman UHF TV antenna using fractal elements.


Materials:

Total cost: beats me. I had all of this just sitting around in my messy basement workshop.


Assembly:
  1. Cut the 2 wire coat hangers into 12 straight pieces, each piece 130 mm long.
  2. Starting at one end, mark both 1354 mm long insulated solid wires at the following intervals: 142 mm, and then 60 mm intervals, 18 times in a row. The final length left over on the other end should be 142 mm.
  3. Bend the wire at each mark by hand into the shapes shown. All but two of the bends are 90 degrees, very easy to do by eye.
  4. Cable-tie the shapes together as shown.
  5. Cable-tie the shapes to the vertical dowels as shown.
  6. Measure and mark the wood pieces. (Top bars are optional. I used them for a little additional strength and to keep the spacing measurements fixed correctly.)
  7. Drill a bunch of holes where needed. (I needed 22 holes total, but that's just me.)
  8. Assemble the main antenna elements; base, vertical dowels, top bar (optional.) I drilled snug holes for inserting both ends of the vertical dowels and tapped them into place in the base and top bar.
  9. Install the reflecting elements into the rear holders; I used a cordless drill to spin the wire lengths into the holes, which I drilled for a snug fit. It worked perfectly, and they are tightly fixed in place without glue. The top and bottom reflecting elements should be level (more or less) with the top and bottom of the antenna element. Element spacing: 70 mm, 40 mm, 40 mm, 40 mm, 70 mm. As shown.
  10. Screw the rear reflecting element holders into the base, as shown. Spacing from the reflecting elemets to the antenna elements is about 55 mm on my rig (the non-fractal version calls for 100 mm spacing.)
  11. Attach reflecter holders top bar (optional.) For the top bar, I drilled holes and spun in short lengths of coat hanger wire, and then tapped in the remaining length.
  12. Strip a little insulation off the centers of each element and attach the transformer to the drilled wood center bracket, as shown.

Hook 'er up and see how she does. Mine is dandy.